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Where we work By Helena Stone

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We have Helena Stone stopping by today with her new release Patience from Pride Publishing

Where any of us work depends, of course, in large part on what our job is. Some jobs can only be done away from home while others could be done without ever leaving our house.

Both main characters in Patience work from home in a way. Xander is an artist and has transformed one of his spare bedrooms into a studio. While he’d be the first to concede that the lighting in that room is not perfect, it is more than good enough for his purposes at the moment the story starts, and the convenience of being able to work whenever inspiration strikes, far outweighs any disadvantages.

Troy used to have a separate work and home life. He lived in a modern apartment he owned and worked in a tattoo parlour in Dublin’s city centre. Recently he has opened his own place. He was supposed to own and operate the parlour with another man, but after his business-partner-to-be deserts him, Troy felt he didn’t have a choice but to sell his flat and move into the rooms situated behind the parlour. He doesn’t mind living more or less in his workplace, but he does miss the more luxurious surroundings he used to inhabit.

For both of these men, working and living in the same space works. It saves on expenses and means they’re more flexible as far as their working hours are concerned.

I have two jobs and I’m very lucky that I get to work with words for both of them. The day job does require me to leave the house. While I probably own enough books to open one of my own, I spend about twenty hours every week in a dedicated library. And, as working environments go, it would be next to impossible to beat working among books while dealing with people who enjoy reading and appreciate words as much as I do.

My writing I could, in theory, do anywhere. In fact I know (of) quite a few authors who leave their house in order to write elsewhere and I understand why that might work for them. It isn’t always easy to ignore all the chores I should be doing while I’m sitting at my dining table typing away. I tried writing away from home in the past. I’ve taken my laptop and/or notebook to coffee shops and even to the library fully expecting to be able to concentrate better away from floors that could do with sweeping and beds demanding to be made. However, I’ve discovered it doesn’t work for me.

I’m not sure what my ‘problem’ is, but unless I’m sitting at my own table, the words refuse to flow. While writing at home often seems to happen almost without any effort from me, it becomes a huge struggle when I’m elsewhere. I find myself having a hard time concentrating and having to fight to get the sentences to form. More often than not I end up rewriting or even completely deleting anything I did manage to write as soon as I’m home again. I would love to know why that is, if only because once I know the reason I might also be able to come up with a way to break the pattern and become more comfortable working on my stories wherever I might happen to be when the mood or an idea strikes.

Maybe it’s just that I’m pretty much a homebody, and am probably at my happiest and therefore most relaxed in my own space. And of course it isn’t an issue most of the time. However, I haven’t quite figured out what I’ll do if I ever find myself in a situation where I have to be away from home for any length of time. Would it mean having to take a break from my writing or would it be the ideal situation to at last learn how to be more flexible? I’ve got a feeling time will eventually tell.

And what about you? If you could pick your own perfect place to work, where would you end up doing the job?

Blurb

Patience is a virtue. But what if you wait too long?

While Xander Ekman’s dream of becoming a successful artist has come true, his love life has gone from bad to worse. Sick of the endless string of one-night stands, he accepts the challenge when his best friend, Erik, bets him that he can’t be celibate for a month. Now all he needs is a reminder to keep his distance in the heat of the moment.

Troy Moriarty doesn’t have time for love. He’s too busy trying to keep his recently opened tattoo parlor afloat. Besides, ever since the man who was supposed to be his business partner abandoned him to run the shop on his own, he has a hard time trusting others.

When Xander turns to Troy for a tattoo that will remind him to be patient, the attraction is instant. But faced with Xander’s month of celibacy, Troy’s trust issues, and a nemesis lurking in the background, their relationship may be doomed before it has a chance to begin.

https://www.pride-publishing.com/book/patience

About the Author 

Helena Stone can’t remember a life before words and reading. After growing up in a household where no holiday or festivity was complete without at least one new book, it’s hardly surprising she now owns more books than shelf space while her Kindle is about to explode.

The urge to write came as a surprise. The realisation that people might enjoy her words was a shock to say the least. Now that the writing bug has well and truly taken hold, Helena can no longer imagine not sharing the characters in her head and heart with the rest of the world.

Having left the hustle and bustle of Amsterdam for the peace and quiet of the Irish Country side she divides her time between reading, writing, long and often wet walks with the dog, her part-time job in a library, a grown-up daughter and her ever loving and patient husband.

Helena Stone can be found on Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads and Pinterest, and you can also take a look at her website.

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